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How to Treat Car Sickness in Pets

How to Treat Car Sickness in Pets
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As some pet owners know, traveling in the car with your furry friends can be a real problem. Humans aren’t the only ones who can get car sick! Even a short ride to the park or the vet can result in loud complaining, and even vomiting.

Add to that the fact that pets often don’t understand why they’re getting car sick, and you have a problem that can be really hard to solve. Pets will simply associate the car with being sick after some time, so that being put in the car, or even seeing you pack, will make them resist, try to hide, and will generally make your pet anxious.

There are some ways you can help make the car ride easier for your pets. Follow these simple tips from PetCareRx.com and PetMD.com to help your pet enjoy the car ride instead of fearing it.

  • Travel on an empty stomach. If your pet is prone to vomiting in the car, making them skip a meal before your next trip can often help prevent car sickness.
  • Start with short trips. Short trips will help your pet get accustomed to the car.
  • Make it pleasant. Help your pet associate the car with something pleasant. Instead of bringing them only to the vet, bring them to the park a few times so that they associate car ride with pleasant result.
  • Bring a cage. Cages or crates can help your pets be more comfortable in the car. They won’t be able to move around as much (therefore reducing motion sickness).
  • Open the windows. Fresh air can help with motion sickness.
  • Bring toys. If your pet has a favourite toy, this can help distract them during the drive.

There are also drug-based treatments you can try. Some drugs may sedate your pet to keep them from becoming agitated in the car, while others may work by supressing vomiting. PetMD.com also suggests feeding ginger to your pet before the drive; ginger acts as a natural vomiting suppressant.

We won’t offer suggestions for medication or dosage here; please consult your vet, as dosage and prescriptions for pets are very different from humans. Never medicate your pet without consulting your vet first.


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