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If you see or go through something traumatic, avoid heading straight to bed.

If you see or go through something traumatic, avoid heading straight to bed.
/ Photographer, Basak Gurbuz Derman / Moment / Getty Images

If you see or go through something traumatic, avoid heading straight to bed. A new study suggests sleeping after experiencing a traumatic event might actually forge negative memories and emotions in the brain.

People in the study who stayed awake displayed a weaker emotional response and weaker memory of bad images than the ones who slept. "Not only did sleep protect the memory, but it also protected the emotional reaction," The study could have implications in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder.

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