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'Zoom fatigue' is telling us we need in-person interactions

'Zoom fatigue' is telling us we need in-person interactions
Woman attending a video-conference call for work / MR.Cole_Photographer / Moment / Getty Images

In-human interactions will always be better than any other form of communication. From phoning, to texting, and now to video-calling, digital forms of communication have proven to us that we need in-person interactions to survive.

'Zoom fatigue', the new phenomenon created by the increase in video-calling over the global pandemic, has impacted many. A research done on 'zoom fatigue' revealed that "participants' brains "synchronized" when they were in each other's presence but did not do so when they were chatting through a screen."

Not only is 'zoom fatigue' affecting adults who require to use video-calling as a primary method of interacting with colleagues, but it is also affecting young children. Certain social norms are harder for youth to learn through the usage of technology, such as sharing. This new norm also opens up the doors to more cyberbullying and other issues among youth.

For adults specifically, 'zoom fatigue' has also created more problems such as reduced brain synchronization, delayed social feedback and interaction, difficulty retaining attention, and more.

Have you personally felt affected by 'zoom fatigue'? 

MR.Cole_Photographer / Moment / Getty Images

Source: MR.Cole_Photographer / Moment / Getty Images

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